Wellness checks

We implemented a wellness check process nationally for all employees, contractors, donors, visitors and volunteers early on in the pandemic. This process is in place to protect the health and safety of our teams and to help maintain our essential operations.  If you have questions, please speak with your manager.

Employee Wellness Checklist and provincial health guidelines

Before coming to work each day, employees (including fee for service) and volunteers are required to review the online Employee Wellness Checklist applicable to their province to determine if they meet the wellness criteria. If you answer yes or receive a result that indicates you should be isolating or getting tested, please reach out to your supervisor.

If you have any questions about this information or return to work, please contact EHS@blood.ca.

The following links are subject to change and are not actively monitored and updated by Canadian Blood Services. The summaries of provincial public health testing and self-isolation requirements should be used primarily as a reference tool. It shall not be taken as legal or public health advice. Please refer to your local and provincial public health authority, as applicable, for the most up to date information and requirements. In all cases, the public health requirements shall supersede Canadian Blood Services summary tables.

British Columbia

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing?   
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms 

Testing is recommended for people who meeting one of the following criteria and have symptoms associated with COVID-19 infection:

(1) People for whom testing is clinically indicated

  • Hospitalized individuals of any age 
  • Pregnant women or individuals  

People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised:

  • Have had an organ transplant and are taking anti-rejection medications
  • Are receiving treatment for cancer
  • Have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant
  • Have been diagnosed with a primary immunodeficiency disorder
  • Have been diagnosed with HIV and are not currently taking medication for it
  • Are on active treatment with immunosuppressive therapies
  • Are on dialysis and/or have severe kidney disease

People who are: 

  • 70 years or older with 3 or more chronic conditions that increase the risk of severe illness or hospitalization (may include obesity, diabetes, heart failure, stroke, and/or neurological conditions), regardless of vaccination status.

People who are unvaccinated if they are: 

  • 50 years of age and older; or 
  • Have 3 or more chronic conditions that increase risk of severe illness or hospitalization 

People who have not received a booster dose if they are: 

  • Aged 50-69 years and have 3 or more chronic conditions that increase the risk of severe illness or hospitalization;  
  • Aged 70 years and older and have one or more chronic conditions that increase the risk of severe illness or hospitalization 

People with conditions that put them at risk, including:

  • cystic fibrosis;
  • severe COPD or asthma requiring hospitalization in the last year;
  • taking biologics for asthma, severe lung disease, and at least one of the following:  
    • long-term home therapy  
    • assessment for lung transplant  
    • severe pulmonary arterial hypertension 
    • severe pulmonary fibrosis/interstitial lung disease;  
  • diagnosed with a rare blood disorder or inborn error of metabolism;
  • splenectomy or functional asplenia;
  • insulin-dependent diabetes;
  • significant developmental disabilities;
  • neurological or other condition requiring use of a ventilator or continuous bi-PAP;
  • on dialysis or have stage 5 chronic kidney disease (eGFR ≤ 15 ml/min).

People who self-identify as Indigenous and are any of: 

  • 70+ years old; 
  • 50+ years old, and haven’t had 3 doses of vaccine; 
  • Unvaccinated (any age). 

(2) Individuals who live or work in settings with others who are at high-risk for severe illness: 

  • Healthcare workers in hospitals, long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities or in a clinic in the community
  • First responders (i.e. police officer, emergency medical technician /paramedic, or firefighter)
  • Staff and residents in congregate settings, such as long-term care facilities, shelters, correctional facilities and group homes 
  • Communities that are far from testing centres and hospitals, such as rural, remote, isolated, or Indigenous communities, or work-camps. 

Testing is not recommended for other adults or children who develop mild symptoms. They are advised to stay home or self-isolate until they feel well enough to resume their regular activities. 

Self-Assessment Tool and App

Testing

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19

If you test positive and are fully vaccinated or are under 18 years old, self-isolate for 5 days since the start of symptoms or positive test and until your fever has resolved without fever reducing medication and symptoms improved.

If persons with symptoms are not recommended for testing or if you test negative, self-isolate until you feel well enough to return to regular activities and no longer have fever (without the use of medicines that reduce fever-like Tylenol or Advil).

Isolation

Other isolation requirements 

Individual Travel including for how long 

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members 

Everyone in the household should monitor for symptoms consistent with COVID-19 and stay home if they develop symptoms.

Close contact including for how long 

Close contacts of people who have tested positive for COVID-19 or have symptoms of COVID-19 do not need to self-isolate. Monitor yourself for symptoms of COVID-19. Follow relevant public health measures and PHO orders. If you develop symptoms, stay at home until you are well enough to participate in your usual activities and check to see if you are recommended to get tested.  

Additional supporting information: 

Self-Assessment Tool and App: https://bc.thrive.health

 

Testing: http://www.bccdc.ca/health-info/diseases-conditions/covid-19/testing/when-to-get-a-covid-19-test

http://www.bccdc.ca/Health-Info-Site/Documents/COVID_public_guidance/When_to_get_tested.pdf

Isolation: http://www.bccdc.ca/health-info/diseases-conditions/covid-19/self-isolation#How--long.

 

For positive cases: http://www.bccdc.ca/health-info/diseases-conditions/covid-19/if-you-have-covid-19.

For close contacts: http://www.bccdc.ca/health-info/diseases-conditions/covid-19/self-isolation/close-contacts. 

Alberta

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing? 
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms 

Free PCR testing from AHS is only available to symptomatic people (unless otherwise referred by a health care professional) at risk of severe illness or working in high-risk settings:

  • Healthcare workers
  • Group home, disability support and shelter workers
  • Correctional facility workers
  • Individuals who provide services in a clinical care setting, including hospitals, clinics, pharmacies

Eligible through self-referral: People with symptoms who live or work in isolated and remote First Nation, Inuit, and Métis communities

Eligible with referral from a health care provider:

  • People with symptoms who may be eligible for Paxlovid or Remdesivir (anti-viral drug)
  • People with symptoms who are pregnant

Symptoms

Assessment and Testing Tool

Testing Eligibility

Eligibility for testing based on other reasons

Eligible with referral from a health care provider: People who have been referred for testing as part of their medical assessment 

Eligible through self-referral: Healthcare workers or workers in specific high-risk settings.

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19

It is recommended that people who have symptoms or who test positive should isolate at home for at least five days from the start of symptoms, and wear a mask for the next five days while in indoor spaces with other people. 

If you tested positive with no symptoms, you should isolate and take a second test 24 hours later. If the second test is negative, isolation can end unless you develop symptoms. If the second test is positive, you should isolate for at least 5 days or until symptoms have improved, if present, and you’ve been free of fever for 24 hours without the use of medication, whichever is longer, and wear a mask for the next 5 days while in indoor spaces with others. 

If you tested negative with symptoms, you should stay home and repeat the test after 24 hours. If both tests are negative, you should stay home until symptoms have improved and you have been fever free without the use of medication for 24 hours.

Isolation

Other isolation requirements 

Individual Travel including for how long 

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members 

Recommended to monitor for 7 days after last exposure. Where possible, avoid close contact with vulnerable people.

Close contact including for how long 

Recommended to monitor for 7 days after last exposure. Where possible, avoid close contact with vulnerable people.

Additional supporting information: 

Self-Assessment Tool: https://myhealth.alberta.ca/Journey/COVID-19/Pages/Assessment.aspx.

Testing: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/topics/Page17058.aspx.

Isolation: https://www.alberta.ca/isolation.aspx

Saskatchewan

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions. 
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing? 
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating. 

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms or a positive test for COVID-19 

If you are experiencing mild cold-like symptoms including cough, sore throat, or sneezing without fever, it is recommended that you stay home, use rapid antigen testing and self-isolate based on those results.  

SHA Public PCR testing is now reserved for priority populations at elevated risk for severe outcomes, including:  

  • Symptomatic immunocompromised and those with chronic illness (diabetes, history of cancer, cardiac failure, transplant donors and recipients, oncology patients receiving chemotherapy)   
  • Symptomatic pregnant women or individuals greater than 30 weeks gestation,  
  • Symptomatic people living/working in Indigenous communities with no access to rapid antigen tests 
  • Hospitalized patients including newborns, if parents COVID-positive 
  • Patients and residents transferred between facilities and upon entry to long-term and personal care homes 
  • High-risk populations as ordered by Medical Health officers, such as international travellers from an area of concern; as part of outbreak investigations in settings such as long-term care homes, personal care homes, congregate living (corrections, shelters, etc.) 
  • Patients on a surgical waitlist with symptoms or a positive rapid antigen test, if scheduled or expecting to receive surgery within the next 90 days 

Additionally, health care workers and essential workers with negative rapid test results who remain symptomatic will continue to be eligible for PCR tests to protect Saskatchewan’s essential services. 

Symptoms 

Testing

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19

Public health recommends that anyone who experiences symptoms should self-isolate and use testing, where available. No specific isolation time period is provided for those who have symptoms but have not tested.  

It is recommended that you self-isolate for five days from the date of test or 24 hours since any fever has resolved, without the aid of fever-reducing medications and all other symptoms are improving for at least 48 hours, whichever is later.

Isolation

Other isolation requirements  

  

Individual Travel including for how long  

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members  

You should self-monitor for symptoms for at least 10 days. Household members who have a compromised immune system or chronic health conditions may want to stay in another home or place of residence if possible. If you are sharing your home, if is recommended that you stay and sleep in a room away from others and use a separate bathroom if you can.

Close contact including for how long  

Self-monitoring for at least 10 days is recommended for close contacts. Self-test immediately and again on days three and five from the point of exposure to the confirmed case. Close contacts can continue to go to work and school while self-monitoring and should respect and follow all organizational policies and guidelines that are in place to protect others. You should self-isolate if you become symptomatic or if you test positive.

Additional supporting information:  

Assessment/Self-monitoring: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/about-covid-19/self-monitoring​​​​​​​

Testing: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/testing-information/where 

Self-Testing: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/testing-information/rapid-testing

 

Manitoba

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing? 
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms  

Only eligible people can access PCR testing. Your health care provider will determine whether a PCR test is needed based on your specific situation, which may include: 

  • People with symptoms when knowing if they have COVID-19 is important for their medical care. This includes, but is not limited to people who are:
  • hospitalized, or
  • who may be eligible for COVID-19 treatment
  • People with symptoms when knowing if they have COVID-19 is important for the ongoing surveillance of COVID-19 activity and variants in Manitoba. This may include people who:
  • are moderately or severely immunocompromised,
  • have traveled outside of Canada in the past 14 days, or
  • people who live in a congregate setting (e.g., personal care home or community residential home/facility) especially if there has been no known case in the facility or specific unit in last 14 days 
  • People admitted to a health care facility, including prior to surgery
  • People advised by public health officials, which might include investigating confirmed or suspected outbreaks in high-risk settings

Symptoms and When to Get Tested 

Online Screening Tool 

Testing Eligibility   

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19 

 

 

 

Isolation is recommended when you test positive on a laboratory-based test, on a rapid antigen test, or if you have symptoms without testing. You should self-isolate for 5 days after symptoms start and until you have no fever, and your other symptoms have improved over the past 24 hours.  You should also avoid non-essential visits to high-risk settings (e.g. personal care homes, health care facilities, etc.) and non-essential contact with individuals at high risk of severe outcomes for 10 days after your symptoms started, or if you don’t develop symptoms, for 10 days after your test date. As well, you should wear a well-made, well-fitted mask during this 10-day period if/when you have contact with other people. 

If you have a negative result do not assume you are negative for COVID-19, it is recommended you take a second test 24 hours after your first and, if available, a third test 24 hours after the second.

If all tests are negative, you can resume your regular activities as long as you have no fever and your symptoms have been improving for 24 hours. If you have been advised to self-isolate (quarantine), you are still required to complete your self-isolation (quarantine) period.

Isolation

Other isolation requirements  

  

Individual Travel including for how long  

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members  

All household members of someone who has symptoms, tests positive or is awaiting test results should self-monitor for symptoms for 14 days following exposure and are not routinely required to self-isolate (quarantine), except where advised by public health in high-risk situations, such as outbreaks, or in health care facilities.

Close contact including for how long  

Close contacts are not routinely required to self-isolate (quarantine), except where advised by public health in high-risk situations, such as outbreaks, or in health care facilities. If you live in a First Nation community, check with your community for further guidance. 

Additional supporting information:  

Assessment

Symptoms: https://www.manitoba.ca/covid19/fundamentals/symptoms.html 

Screening tool: https://sharedhealthmb.ca/covid19/screening-tool/ 

Screening questions: Covid-19 Generic Screening Checklist June 2021 (manitoba.ca) 

 

Testing: https://manitoba.ca/covid19/testing/testing-eligibility.html  

 

Isolation: https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/fundamentals/self-isolation.html#when-isolate 

Ontario

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing?   
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms 

You are eligible for PCR or rapid molecular testing if you (1) have COVID-19 symptoms, AND (2) belong to any of the following groups: 

  • people aged 70 years and older 
  • people aged 60 years and older who have less than three doses of COVID 19 vaccine 
  • people who are immunocompromised 
  • adults aged 18 years and older who have had less than three doses of COVID 19 vaccine and have risk conditions 
  • other people at higher risk of severe disease who may be eligible for COVID 19 treatment if they tested positive 
  • pregnant people 
  • patient-facing healthcare workers 
  • staff, volunteers, residents/inpatients, essential care providers, and visitors in highest risk settings, including: 
  • hospitals, including complex continuing care facilities and paramedic services 
    • congregate living settings with medically and socially vulnerable individuals, including, but not limited to, long-term care homes, retirement homes 
    • First Nation elder care lodges 
    • group homes 
    • shelters 
    • hospices 
    • correctional institutions 
    • hospital schools 
    • household members of staff in highest risk settings and patient-facing health care workers 
  • home and community care workers 
  • staff and students in Provincial and Demonstration Schools 
  • international agriculture workers in congregate living settings 
  • patients seeking emergency medical care, at the discretion of the treating clinician 
  • other outpatients for whom a diagnostic test is required for clinical management, at the discretion of the treating clinician 
  • people who are underhoused or experiencing homelessness 
  • first responders, including fire, police and paramedics 

Self-Assessment Tool

Symptoms

Testing and Isolation

Eligibility for testing based on other reasons

Whether you have symptoms or not, you are eligible for PCR or rapid POC molecular testing if you: 

  • Are an individual from a First Nation, Inuit, Métis community, and/or who self-identifies as First Nation, Inuit, and Métis and their household members 
  • Are an individual travelling into First Nation, Inuit, Métis communities for work 
  • Are being admitted or transferred to or from a hospital or congregate living setting 
  • Are a close contact of someone in a confirmed or suspected outbreak in a highest risk setting, or other settings as directed by the local public health unit 
  • Are scheduled for a surgical procedure requiring general anesthetic in the next 24-48 hours 
  • Have written prior approval for out-of-country medical services from the General Manager of OHIP or are a caregiver for someone who does 
  • People 24-48 hours prior to treatment for cancer or prior to hemodialysis, at the discretion of the treating clinician 
  • Newborns born to people with confirmed COVID-19 at the time of birth within 24 hours of delivery, with a repeat test at 48 hours after birth if baseline test is negative, or if the parental test results are pending at the time of discharge. 

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19

The province has adopted an “all respiratory virus approach” for the fall. The following isolation periods are recommended, based on population: 

Individuals with severe COVID-19-related illness (requiring ICU level of care, e.g., respiratory dysfunction, hypoxia, shock and/or multi-system organ dysfunction): At least 20 days (or at discretion of hospital IPAC) after the date of specimen collection or symptom onset (whichever is earlier/ applicable) and until symptoms have been improving for 24 hours (or 48 hours if gastrointestinal symptoms) and no fever present. 

Individuals who reside in a highest risk setting (acute care settings; congregate living settings with medically and socially vulnerable individuals; and employer-provided living settings of International Agricultural Workers); are hospitalized for COVID-19 related illness (not requiring ICU level of care); or are immuno-compromised**:  At least 10 days after the date of specimen collection or symptom onset (whichever is earlier/ applicable) and until symptoms have been improving for 24 hours (or 48 hours if gastrointestinal symptoms) and no fever present. Note that duration of isolation may be modified based on hospital IPAC direction (for inpatients) or health care provider direction (for immunocompromised** individuals). Setting-specific guidance prevails for case isolation in highest risk settings. 

** NOTE Immunocompromised includes, e.g., cancer chemotherapy; untreated HIV infection with CD4 T lymphocyte count <200; combined primary immuno-deficiency disorder; taking prednisone >20 mg/day (or equivalent) for more than 14 days; and taking other immune suppressive medications.  

All other individuals who have COVID-19 symptoms OR who have tested positive for COVID-19: Until symptoms have been improving for 24 hours (or 48 hours if gastrointestinal symptoms) and no fever present. Asymptomatic individuals with a positive test result do not need to self-isolate unless symptoms develop. If symptoms develop, they should self-isolate immediately. 

For a total of 10 days after the date of specimen collection or symptom onset (whichever is earlier/ applicable), individuals should: 

  • Continue to wear a well-fitted mask in all public settings (including schools and childcare, unless under 2 years old) and avoid non-essential activities where mask removal is necessary (e.g., dining out, playing a wind instrument, high contact sports where masks cannot be safely worn). 
  • Not visit anyone who is immuno-compromised or at higher risk of illness (e.g., seniors) 
  • Avoid non-essential visits to highest risk settings such as hospitals and long-term care homes. 

Testing and Isolation

Other isolation requirements 

Individual Travel including for how long 

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members 

For a total of 10 days after the last exposure to the COVID-19 positive case or individual with COVID-19 symptoms, the individual notified by a case should: 

  • Self-monitor for symptoms. They should self-isolate immediately if they develop any symptom of COVID-19 and seek testing if eligible; 
  • Wear a well fitted mask in all public settings: Individuals should maintain masking as much as possible in public settings (including school and child care, unless under 2 years old). Reasonable exceptions would include removal for essential activities like eating, while maintaining as much distancing as possible. Participation in activities where masking can be maintained throughout may be resumed, but individuals should avoid activities where mask removal would be necessary (e.g., dining out; playing a wind instrument; high contact sports where masks cannot be safely worn). Individuals who are unable to mask (e.g., children under two years of age, etc.) may return to public settings without masking. 
  • Avoid non-essential visits to anyone who is immuno-compromised or at higher risk of illness (e.g., seniors); and 
  • Avoid non-essential visits to highest risk settings such as hospitals and long-term care homes. Where essential visit cannot be avoided, close contacts should wear a medical mask, maintain physical distancing, and notify the highest risk setting of their recent exposure.

Close contact including for how long 

For a total of 10 days after the last exposure to the COVID-19 positive case or individual with COVID-19 symptoms, the individual notified by a case should: 

  • Self-monitor for symptoms. They should self-isolate immediately if they develop any symptom of COVID-19 and seek testing if eligible; 
  • Wear a well fitted mask in all public settings: Individuals should maintain masking as much as possible in public settings (including school and child care, unless under 2 years old). Reasonable exceptions would include removal for essential activities like eating, while maintaining as much distancing as possible. Participation in activities where masking can be maintained throughout may be resumed, but individuals should avoid activities where mask removal would be necessary (e.g., dining out; playing a wind instrument; high contact sports where masks cannot be safely worn). Individuals who are unable to mask (e.g., children under two years of age, etc.) may return to public settings without masking. 
  • Avoid non-essential visits to anyone who is immuno-compromised or at higher risk of illness (e.g., seniors); and 
  • Avoid non-essential visits to highest risk settings such as hospitals and long-term care homes. Where essential visit cannot be avoided, close contacts should wear a medical mask, maintain physical distancing, and notify the highest risk setting of their recent exposure. 

Additional supporting information: 

Assessment: https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/

Testing and Isolation:

https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/publichealth/coronavirus/docs/contact_mngmt/management_cases_contacts.pdf

https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-test-and-testing-location-information#who-is-eligible-for-pcr-or-rapid-poc-molecular-testing

Quebec

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions. 
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing? 
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating. 

The following links from the Quebec government are provided for information purposes only. Canadian Blood Services staff who live in Quebec but work in Ontario will still need to check the Ontario requirements and recommendations for isolation before returning to work, as the rules in Ontario will apply to workplaces in Ontario. 

Assessment: https://www.quebec.ca/sante/problemes-de-sante/a-z/coronavirus-2019/isolement/outil-autoevaluation-covid-19

Testing: https://www.quebec.ca/sante/problemes-de-sante/a-z/coronavirus-2019/tests-de-depistage/faire-test-de-depistage  

Isolation: https://www.quebec.ca/en/health/health-issues/a-z/2019-coronavirus/self-isolation/when-do-i-need-to-self-isolate

New Brunswick

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate or stay home under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing? 
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms 

PCR tests for symptomatic people are only for those who are:

  • 50 and over and under 2
  • Live/work in a hospital, Extra Mural and Ambulance New Brunswick, LTC, correctional facility, shelter or is precariously housed or for individuals requiring a PCR test for international travel
  • Immunocompromised or pregnant

Symptoms

Testing

Eligibility for testing based on other reasons

Everyone not encompassed by the above row will be advised to take point-of-care rapid tests when symptomatic. A positive rapid test will be treated as a positive result for COVID-19.

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19

People who test positive for COVID-19 are encouraged to stay home and work from home if possible:  

  • While sick
  • Until your symptoms improve
  • Until you have been fever free for 24 hours
  • Until you have been diarrhea and vomit free for 48 hours

Once you are no longer feeling sick you are encouraged to wear a three-layer well-fitting mask for 5 days, or for 10 days if you are immunocompromised. 

Isolation

Other isolation requirements 

Individual Travel including for how long 

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members 

Household contacts should monitor for symptoms and stay home if they are feeling sick. If a household contact develops symptoms, they can complete the online form and request a test 

Close contact including for how long 

No isolation requirements for close contacts 

Additional supporting information: 

Assessment

Testing: https://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/corporate/promo/covid-19/about-covid-19/testing-tracing.html

Isolation: https://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/corporate/promo/covid-19/self_isolation.html#1.2

Nova Scotia

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing?   
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms  

Rapid antigen testing is available for those with symptoms. PCR testing is focused on people who have symptoms AND fall into one of the categories listed here

  • 50+ 
  • Unvaccinated/ partially vaccinated AND 12+ 
  • Live/work in a long-term care home, residential care facilities, corrections, shelters/ transition houses, acute care settings, entering a Disability Support Program facility 
  • First Nations 
  • African Nova Scotians (18+) 
  • Front line community health care workers  
  • Adults 18-49 with one or more risk factors for severe disease: Obesity; type I or II diabetes mellitus; chronic lung disease, including poorly-controlled asthma (e.g., on medication or hospitalized within the past 12 months); chronic kidney disease, including those on dialysis; Down Syndrome; Motor Neuron Disease; Multiple Sclerosis; Myasthenia Gravis; Huntington’s Disease; immunocompromised or receiving immunosuppressive therapy  
  • Youth under 18 with any of the following: history of prematurity, chronic lung disease, cystic fibrosis, severe asthma, Down Syndrome, Motor Neuron Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Myasthenia Gravis, obesity 
  • Pregnant 
  • Individuals who cannot perform a rapid test at home and require help due to a developmental, intellectual or physical disability 

Self-Assessment Tool

Symptoms

Testing

Eligibility for testing based on other reasons

PCR tests are also available for: 

  • Testing required for medical procedures 

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms  or who test positive for COVID-19

It is recommended that you self-isolate if you have COVID-19 symptoms or have tested positive for COVID-19. Stay home and avoid high risk settings. 

Isolation

Other isolation requirements 

Individual Travel including for how long  

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members  

It is no longer recommended to test upon exposure unless you begin to experience symptoms. Exposures are recommended to wear a mask while in crowded indoor settings.

Close contact including for how long  

It is no longer recommended to test upon exposure unless you begin to experience symptoms. Exposures are recommended to wear a mask while in crowded indoor settings  

Additional supporting information:  

Assessment: https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en 

Testing: https://www.nshealth.ca/coronavirustesting 

Isolation: https://www.nshealth.ca/what-do-i-need-know-about-covid-19-self-isolation 

Information for COVID-19 Close Contacts | Nova Scotia Health Authority (nshealth.ca)

Prince Edward Island

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing?   
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms 

Everyone who has symptoms should be tested.

Self-Assessment Tool 

Symptoms

Testing

Eligibility for testing based on other reasons

You should be tested: 

  • If you are a close contact and work, live, or access services in a vulnerable setting with no symptoms, you should be tested on day 4 
  • If you tested positive with a rapid test 

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19

Persons who have COVID-19 must self-isolate for a period of at least 5 days after the onset of Covid symptoms or at least 5 days after the date of their initial positive antigen test, whichever is earlier, and for such additional time as indicated by a PHO (including 10 days for immunocompromised individuals). After isolation, you must wear a mask for the next 5 days in all indoor settings where physical distancing of more than 2 metres cannot be maintained.

If you complete your 5-day isolation but experience a return of COVID-19 symptoms within 8 days of recovery, and test positive for COVID-19 after the return of symptoms, you must self-isolate for at least 5 days after the return of the COVID-19 symptoms, or for such additional time as indicated by a public health official. 

If you are symptomatic and awaiting the results of a COVID-19 test, you must self-isolate until you receive a negative test. 

Isolation

Other isolation requirements 

Individual Travel including for how long 

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members 

If you live with someone with COVID-19 and they cannot isolate away from you, then you must isolate for the same period of time as the positive case. If you are not experiencing any symptoms, you can exit isolation on the last day of the positive case’s isolation.  

If you live, work, or access services in a vulnerable setting and/or are experiencing symptoms, you should be tested at a testing clinic on the last day of isolation for the positive case. 

Continue to monitor for symptoms from 10 days since your last contact with the positive case. If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, follow the self-isolation guidelines. 

Close contact including for how long 

Fully vaccinated close contacts who have symptoms must self-isolate for at least 5 days after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms or at least 5 days after the date of the initial positive antigen test, whichever is earlier, and for such additional time as indicated by a public health official (including 10 days for immunocompromised individuals).   

If you tested positive for Covid (by a molecular test at a Health PEI clinic or as determined by a public health official) and completed your isolation period in 60 days previous to being a close contact, you do not need to isolate but must monitor for symptoms and, if symptomatic, self-isolate until symptoms resolve or are improving. 

If you receive a negative Covid molecular test result from a Health PEI clinic, you may exit isolation at an earlier date, but should continue to be tested for COVID-19 at a Health PEI clinic if you continue to have symptoms of COVID-19 after receiving the negative molecular test result. 

If you do not fall under the above and are symptomatic and awaiting a test result, you shall self-isolate until you receive a negative test. 

Additional supporting information: 

Assessment: https://assessment.princeedwardisland.ca/

Testing: https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/information/health-and-wellness/covid-19-testing-in-pei

Isolation: https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/information/health-and-wellness/covid-19-self-isolation

For positive cases: https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/information/health-and-wellness/information-for-people-who-have-tested-positive-for-covid-19

For close contacts: https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/information/health-and-wellness/covid-19-close-contacts

 

Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Are you experiencing any new or worsening symptoms associated with COVID-19? Symptoms should not be chronic or related to other known causes or conditions.
  • Are you required or recommended to self-isolate under local or provincial requirements due to travel, symptoms, close contact or testing?   
  • Complete the applicable provincial COVID-19 assessment screening tool for your jurisdiction below to determine if you need to obtain a COVID-19 test or should be isolating.

Public health criteria for testing and isolation

Description 

Eligibility for testing based on symptoms 

Symptomatic individuals who are at increased risk for severe disease, live or work in congregate settings, or are essential to keeping the health system running are eligible for a PCR test. This includes those who are: 

  • Over 60 and under 2 
  • Non-household contact with symptoms and you do not have rapid tests  
  • Frontline health care worker with direct patient care; 
  • Work in a long-term care home, personal care home, community care home, assisted living facility; 
  • Work in a correctional facility; 
  • Live/work in a shelter, transition house, or temporary foreign worker setting; 
  • Pregnant; 
  • First Nations, Inuit or Metis (18 years and older); 
  • Immunocompromised and potentially eligible for COVID-19 medications; that is: 
    • You are undergoing cancer treatment 
    • You had a solid organ transplant and are taking immunosuppressive therapy
    • You had a stem cell transplant in the last 2 years
    • You have received CAR-T cell treatment in the last 2 years
    • You have a moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (diagnosis of DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, common variable immunodeficiency, Good’s syndrome or hyper IgE syndrome). 
    • You have advanced or untreated HIV (n/a if undetectable viral load) 
    • You are taking high dose corticosteroids (e.g., 20 mg or greater of prednisone daily for over 2 weeks) 
    • You are taking a highly immunosuppressive drug (biologic medication, transplant or chemotherapy related immunosuppressant

Symptoms

Self-Assessment and Testing Referral Tool

Eligibility for testing based on other reasons

You are eligible for a PCR test if any of the following apply:

  • You are a household contact with no symptoms, and you do not have rapid tests
  • Frontline workers with direct patient care and workers who work in vulnerable settings

Time of Isolation for those with Symptoms or who test positive for COVID-19

Self-isolate for 7 days from the date you had your first symptom or, if you have no symptoms, 7 days from the date your positive test was completed. You do not need another test to leave isolation. 

If you test negative for COVID-19 but you have symptoms, you should self-isolate until 24 hours after your symptoms improve.

Isolation Guidelines

Isolation Assessment Tool

Other isolation requirements 

Individual Travel including for how long 

No isolation requirements after travel within Canada. Federal isolation requirements for travelers lifted as of October 1, 2022.

Household members 

If you have had COVID-19 in the last 3 months, there is no need to get tested. If you have symptoms, self-isolate until your symptoms have improved with no fever for at least 24 hours. If you do not have symptoms, there is no need to self-isolate.  

If you have not had COVID-19 in the last three months, you should self-isolate for 7 days from the onset of your first symptom (or 10 days if you are immunocompromised). If you do not have symptoms, you should isolate for 5 days after the person in your household started having symptoms (or, if no symptoms, 5 days after they tested positive). 

Note that if there are multiple cases in your household, your isolation instructions should start over again based on the most recent date a household member tested positive or started having symptoms.  

Close contact including for how long 

If you have had Covid in the last three months: Close contacts do not need be tested for Covid-19. No isolation recommended if you do not have symptoms. If you do have symptoms it is recommended you self-isolate until symptoms have improved with no fever for at least 24 hours.  

If you have not had COVID in the last three months: self-isolate until symptoms have improved with no fever for at least 24 hours. If you do not have symptoms there is no need to self-isolate.

Additional supporting information: 

Assessment and Testing Referral Tool: https://covidassessment.nlchi.nl.ca/

Screening questionnaire (daily fit-to-work assessment):

https://www.gov.nl.ca/covid-19/files/Covid-Questionnaire-Work.pdf

 

Isolation: https://www.gov.nl.ca/covid-19/public-health-guidance/self-isolation/

https://www.gov.nl.ca/covid-19/public-health-guidance/testing/if-you-test-positive/

Isolation assessment tool: https://www.gov.nl.ca/covid-19/public-health-guidance/self-isolation/assessment-tool/

FAQ: Employee wellness checks

How are employees being screened in donor centres?

Posters at the entrances to our sites focus on wellness and remind employees and volunteers to stay home if they are sick, or recommended or required to isolate. Before coming to work each day, employees and volunteers are required to review the online Employee Wellness Checklist applicable to their province to determine if they meet the wellness criteria. The Employee Wellness Checklist can be found on the employee portal and is accessible from any device. Visit: https://www.blood.ca/en/employees/wellness-checks.

Any employee who is sick, including but not limited to those who develop flu-like symptoms, is instructed to stay away from the workplace. 

Employees with COVID-19 symptoms are being asked to contact their physician and local public health authority for direction on whether it is safe to come into work.

Any employee diagnosed with COVID-19 shall not return to work until they are fully recovered in alignment with applicable public health requirements. An individual may also get advice and guidance from public health and/or their physician and may need to consult with EHS. 

We ask that employees refer to, and follow, any applicable requirements for travel. If an employee is required to self-isolate upon return, they are not to return to work until it is deemed safe by their public health authority.

What changes have been implemented to streamline the wellness check process for employees?

New posters at the entrances to our sites focus on wellness and remind employees (including fee for service) and volunteers to stay home if they are sick, or recommended or required to isolate.  

Before coming to work each day, employees (including fee for service) and volunteers are required to review the online Employee Wellness Checklist applicable to their province to determine if they meet the wellness criteria. The Employee Wellness Checklist can be found on the employee portal and is accessible from any device. Visit: https://www.blood.ca/en/employees/wellness-checkpoint

As has always been the case, employees and volunteers are expected to follow their applicable local, provincial public health guidelines.

Why did you remove the employee wellness poster that outlined the public health guidelines specific to my province?

At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, wellness checkpoints were one of the many measures implemented to keep our teams and donors safe and protect our essential operations.   

These measures are being consistently reviewed to ensure we can continue to safely deliver on our promise to patients and improve the donor and employee experience.   

Public health guidance on isolation and testing is rapidly evolving.  Each province and territory establishes their own regulations, and there are differences across all jurisdictions. With public health guidelines rapidly evolving, and differing in each province, it is no longer practical to maintain detailed posters outlining requirements for each province. Wellness guidance for employees remains the same: all who are sick, or recommended or required to isolate must stay home.  
 
Employee wellness checklists specific to each province are now available on the employee portal. To support the wellbeing of everyone in our sites, employees and volunteers are required to review this before coming to work. The checklists can be accessed from any device. Visit: https://www.blood.ca/en/employees/wellness-checkpoint

There is a new poster on the door asking employees to stay home if they are sick, or recommended or required to isolate. How do I know if I am recommended or required to isolate?

As has always been the case, everyone must follow the public health guidelines outlined by their own province. We understand that these guidelines are changing regularly and are different in each province. Please consult your province’s public health resources to review the latest guidance for your area. We have compiled a summary of these guidelines for reference purposes and links to relevant resources, available at: https://www.blood.ca/en/employees/wellness-checkpoint

Why is there a detailed poster specific to donors?

Eligibility to donate is different than eligibility to enter a Canadian Blood Services site. If a donor is feeling sick or should be isolating, they should not be entering. The additional information provided for donors is specific to their eligibility to donate based on our donor selection criteria manual. To improve donor experience, we have highlighted a few COVID-19 specific reasons that would result in a deferral from donating that day. 

Why are employees entering the workplace subjected to different screening criteria than donors seeking to donate?

Before coming to work each day, employees (including fee for service) and volunteers are required to review the online Employee Wellness Checklist applicable to their province to determine if they meet the wellness criteria. 

Eligibility to donate is different than eligibility to enter a Canadian Blood Services site. If a donor is feeling sick or should be isolating, they should not be entering. The additional information provided for donors is specific to their eligibility to donate based on our donor selection criteria manual. To improve donor experience, we have highlighted a some key COVID-19 donor eligibility criteria that could result in a deferral from donating that day.

I have a cough due to a pre-existing condition. I am concerned that if I answer “yes” to having a cough at the wellness checkpoint that I will not be permitted to enter the building even through it isn’t related to COVID-19. What should I do?

Some employees may have COVID-like symptoms that are caused by another medical issue such as allergies or asthma. A declaration from their physician will need to be provided to Employee Health Services in order for a letter to be issued advising that they are safe to report to work. Employees should bring the letter with them each time they report to work. For more information, please speak with your supervisor.  

If an employee cannot obtain a letter from their doctor, we ask that they stay home until they are able to do so. To avoid unnecessary trips outside of the home, we understand that health care providers may be able to email EHS with the letter. 

How do I find out how long I need to isolate before returning to work after testing positive for COVID-19?

Everyone must follow the public health guidelines outlined by their own province. We understand that these guidelines are changing regularly and are different in each province. Please consult your province’s public health resources to review the latest guidance for your area and with employee health services. We have compiled a summary of these guidelines for reference purposes and links to relevant resources, available at: https://www.blood.ca/en/employees/wellness-checkpoint

I have reviewed the provincial public health guidelines and I am not sure what applies to me because of my own personal circumstances. What should I do?

If you have reviewed your provincial guidelines and are still unsure of what is required, please consult public health. For all other questions, contact communications@blood.ca.

The screening process seems less stringent than before, and I am concerned that a simple question about ‘are you well or recommend or required to isolate’ won’t stop sick colleagues from coming to work. Will I be safe?

Your safety at work continues to be a priority. By moving the screening questions online, we are improving the process by directing employees to the latest, most up-to-date public health guidance and resources. Employees are expected to review the Employee Wellness Checklist before coming to work.

How are we supporting those who are visually impaired to read the wellness check questionnaire poster?

To provide support, our teams will always work hard to accommodate donors who are visually impaired by taking the time to read through the questionnaire.

Who should I contact if I have questions/concerns?

For donor-related questions or concerns, please reach out to collectionandcliniclogisticsquestions@blood.ca.

For employee safety questions or concerns, please contact OH&S.

For all other inquiries, please contact communications@blood.ca or visit blood.ca/employees for more information.